Category Archives: wolfgang saus

WOLFGANG SAUS : Overtone singing and throat singing styles in the world

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Overtone singing and throat singing styles in the world

WOLFGANG SAUS

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Overtone singing as a stylistic term encompasses all vocal techniques in which overtones are specifically emphasized and play an independent musical role.

The most famous style beside the Western overtone singing is the Central Asian throat singing from Tuva and Mongolia. But there are other spectacular forms of overtone and throat singing in other parts of the world, e. g. in Africa, Oceania and even in Europe, which I would like to draw your attention to here.

Inhalt

Of course there is no singing without harmonics, because every singing tone contains harmonics. I classify it as overtone singing when the musician’s intention is to provide overtones with their own musical role.

It is important to me to define this from the perspective of the singer, because not everyone perceives the overtones without practice. Transitions from speech to targeted overtones can be fluid (hearing test). According to a study by the University of Heidelberg people hear the overtones very differently, so that even trained musicians do not always immediately recognize the overtones in the voice. Overtone listening is trainable.

Classification by Cultures

Classification by Sound Character

Overtone melodies are the most noticeable, but not the only form of overtone singing. Overtones can be used musically without creating melodies: for tone effects, intonation, resonance and as a basis for scales. Examples are Tibetan monk songs, Barbershop or the Sardinian canto a tenore. The weaker the overtones are compared to the overall sound, the more difficult it is to assign them to overtone singing.

Overtone Melodies

Overtone Sound Scapes

Widespread Misconceptions

For the sake of completeness, I would like to mention singing styles that are erroneously referred to as overtone singing. These are singing techniques called throat singing. Throat singing is used in music ethnological terms, especially in older literature, for throaty, rough songs and singing with narrowing of the larynx and has nothing to do with overtone singing. Only since the 1990s throat singing (as a translation of the Tuvan word khöömej) has become synonymous with Central Asian overtone singing. You have to be careful what kind of throat singing is meant, especially when translating from English. When reading recent literature, one should pay attention to whether the author has carefully researched.

Literature & Sources

Schneider, Peter, Vanessa Sluming, Neil Roberts, Michael Scherg, Rainer Goebel, Hans J Specht, H Günter Dosch, Stefan Bleeck, Christoph Stippich, and André Rupp. “Structural and Functional Asymmetry of Lateral Heschl’s Gyrus Reflects Pitch Perception Preference.” Nat Neurosci 8, no. 9 (2005): 1241–47. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn1530. 2 replies

  1. Simone says: There’s an issue, for Sardinia there is just another video of “A Filetta” singing from Corsica. Could you please fix it? Reply
  2. Franz Klug says: Hoy Wolfgang,ich bin absolut begeistert über deine schöne Seite!
    Seit einiger Zeit stöbere ich immer wieder mal und entdecke immer noch was neues :-)Ich singe so seit ca 25 Jahren Obertöne und bin immer auf der suche nach Anregungen.
    Hier gibt es sie reichlich für mich, dankeschööön.Der “Cosmicbow” hat mich total inspiriert, hab mir gerade auch mal einen gebaut, super Sache.
    Das ist im Moment mein Lieblingsinstrument.Friendly wishes from Palatinatforrest
    Franz Reply

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Overtone singing and throat singing styles in the world

123456789101112131415161718192021222324

Overtone singing as a stylistic term encompasses all vocal techniques in which overtones are specifically emphasized and play an independent musical role.

The most famous style beside the Western overtone singing is the Central Asian throat singing from Tuva and Mongolia. But there are other spectacular forms of overtone and throat singing in other parts of the world, e. g. in Africa, Oceania and even in Europe, which I would like to draw your attention to here.

Inhalt

Of course there is no singing without harmonics, because every singing tone contains harmonics. I classify it as overtone singing when the musician’s intention is to provide overtones with their own musical role.

It is important to me to define this from the perspective of the singer, because not everyone perceives the overtones without practice. Transitions from speech to targeted overtones can be fluid (hearing test). According to a study by the University of Heidelberg people hear the overtones very differently, so that even trained musicians do not always immediately recognize the overtones in the voice. Overtone listening is trainable.

Classification by Cultures

Classification by Sound Character

Overtone melodies are the most noticeable, but not the only form of overtone singing. Overtones can be used musically without creating melodies: for tone effects, intonation, resonance and as a basis for scales. Examples are Tibetan monk songs, Barbershop or the Sardinian canto a tenore. The weaker the overtones are compared to the overall sound, the more difficult it is to assign them to overtone singing.

Overtone Melodies

Overtone Sound Scapes

Widespread Misconceptions

For the sake of completeness, I would like to mention singing styles that are erroneously referred to as overtone singing. These are singing techniques called throat singing. Throat singing is used in music ethnological terms, especially in older literature, for throaty, rough songs and singing with narrowing of the larynx and has nothing to do with overtone singing. Only since the 1990s throat singing (as a translation of the Tuvan word khöömej) has become synonymous with Central Asian overtone singing. You have to be careful what kind of throat singing is meant, especially when translating from English. When reading recent literature, one should pay attention to whether the author has carefully researched.

Literature & Sources

Schneider, Peter, Vanessa Sluming, Neil Roberts, Michael Scherg, Rainer Goebel, Hans J Specht, H Günter Dosch, Stefan Bleeck, Christoph Stippich, and André Rupp. “Structural and Functional Asymmetry of Lateral Heschl’s Gyrus Reflects Pitch Perception Preference.” Nat Neurosci 8, no. 9 (2005): 1241–47. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn1530. 2 replies

  1. Simone says: There’s an issue, for Sardinia there is just another video of “A Filetta” singing from Corsica. Could you please fix it? Reply
  2. Franz Klug says: Hoy Wolfgang,ich bin absolut begeistert über deine schöne Seite!
    Seit einiger Zeit stöbere ich immer wieder mal und entdecke immer noch was neues :-)Ich singe so seit ca 25 Jahren Obertöne und bin immer auf der suche nach Anregungen.
    Hier gibt es sie reichlich für mich, dankeschööön.Der “Cosmicbow” hat mich total inspiriert, hab mir gerade auch mal einen gebaut, super Sache.
    Das ist im Moment mein Lieblingsinstrument.Friendly wishes from Palatinatforrest
    Franz Reply

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Feel free to contribute!

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Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

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https://www.oberton.org/en/overtone-singing/styles/

“Es kommt ein Schiff, geladen” (“A ship is coming laden”) – Overtone Singing

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“Es kommt ein Schiff, geladen” (“A ship is coming laden”) – Overtone Singing

454 viewsNov 28, 202112DislikeShareSaveOvertone Singing – Wolfgang Saus 1.38K subscribers “Es kommt ein Schiff, geladen” (“A ship is coming laden”) is one of the oldest Advent hymns in the German language. It was written before 1450.The oldest record of the melody is found in the Andernacher Gesangsbuch, Cologne 1608. A rhythmic rarity in old hymns is the change from a 6/4 to a 4/4 meter in the middle of the song. The Dorian part of the first part of the song ends on the minor third, while the second part turns to Lydian from the new root and returns to the Dorian finalis at the end. Keys with minor thirds make fundamental changes unavoidable in overtone singing, because the natural harmonic series is tuned to major. A rhythmic rarity in old hymns is the change from a 6/4 to a 4/4 meter in the middle of the song. The Dorian part of the first part of the song ends on the minor third, while the second part turns to Lydian from the new root and returns to the Dorian finalis at the end. Keys with minor thirds make fundamental changes unavoidable in overtone singing, because the natural overtone series is tuned to major. If you would like to sing the song, you can download the free sheet music here: https://www.oberton.org/portfolio-ite… The recording is a spontaneous improvisation by pianist Michael Reimann, who later orchestrated his piano part, and overtone singer Wolfgang Saus. Spontaneous improvisation with changing fundamental tones requires quite some experience.This can be acquired by re-singing the free collection of sheet music at https://www.oberton.org/portfolio-ite…. Performers: Michael Reimann – keys https://michaelreimann.de Wolfgang Saus – overtone singing https://www.oberton.org The video is from Thomas Ritter, Pixabay: https://pixabay.com/videos/glass-sphe…

OVERTONGESANGWOLFGANGSAUSBILDUNG

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https://tranquanghaisworldthroatsinging.com/category/wolfgang-saus/

(Mittelfranken)

Zweite (S)Ausbildungsgruppe Obertongesang ab 30.10.2020 – mit Wolfgang Saus – in Hirschbach (Mittelfranken)

Fr., 30.10.2020 — So., 14.03.2021

€ 1.608

ObertongesangSausbildung Titelbild - Foto Luna Buerger

Intensivausbildungsgruppe in westlichem Obertongesang
und Obertongesangspädagogik nach Wolfgang Saus

für weitere 4 Menschen, die Obertongesang wirklich lernen wollen

Weil der erste Kurs sofort ausgebucht war, biete ich ab 30.10.2020

Pachelbel’s Canon – Overtone Singing

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Pachelbel’s Canon – Overtone Singing

128,973 viewsOct 28, 20143K18ShareSaveOvertone Singing – Wolfgang Saus 1.36K subscribers Wolfgang Saus sings two melodies at the same time: bass & soprano of Pachelbel’s Canon simultaneously. It’s a short demonstration of polyphonic overtone singing skills (sometimes referred to as throat singing) used in special new classical compositions. The interesting thing about doing this with overtone singing is: the melody was always hidden in the overtones of the bass voice. Many ancient composers intuitively created “harmonic” melodies out of overtones of a basso continuo. Painting: „Aachener Farbflügel-Altar” by Günther Beckers. More information: http://www.oberton.org/pachhelbel-kanon/

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Space Sound Voice – Full Documentary about Overtone Singing and Harmonics

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Space Sound Voice – Full Documentary about Overtone Singing and Harmonics

5,095 viewsNov 30, 20192030ShareSaveVoid Visuals 1.82K subscribers This documentary about overtone singing was published in 2010. Now for the 10 years anniversary it is available in full length here. ENJOY! Harmonic Singing (also known as overtone singing) has the power to move us deeply. It is an ancient form of singing, using our voice to produce two or more tones at once. But how does it work? And how can harmonic singing have such a profound effect on us? In the documentary “Space Sound Voice” filmmaker Minghao Xu takes us on a quest for the origins of harmonics, giving us insight in our own ability to sing harmonics. Not only a varied range of international overtone singers is introduced, but also the scientific side is well presented, resulting in an inspirig journey through the world of sound. This film documentation portrays seven musicians and tells the story of my personal fascination for ‘overtone-singing’ and the fractal geometry of sound.

With:

David Hykes

Wolfgang Saus

Christian Bollmann

Danny Wetzels

Hosoo & Transmongolia

Jill Purce

Mark van Tongeren

The DVD with extra materials is available in English and German at the German publishing house https://www.traumzeit-verlag.de/ See my recent works in Animation and VFX on https://voidvisuals.com Support me to create more through Patreon https://www.patreon.com/voidvisuals

“Overtone Singing Part 1” | Full Session Q&A with Philippe Hall & Wolfgang Saus

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“Overtone Singing Part 1” | Full Session Q&A with Philippe Hall & Wolfgang Saus

187 viewsFeb 1, 2021100ShareSaveSinging Revealed 569 subscribers Watch Philippe Hall & Wolfgang Saus answer questions about overtone singing. Topics discussed include reasons to do overtone singing, tongue/pharynx tuning, the ideal range for overtone singing, frequencies, how overtones made, and much more listed below! A unique opportunity to hear from the world’s leading vocal experts! Missed last week’s Livestream? Subscribe on our website, so you don’t miss another! It’s FREE! https://singingrevealed.com/voice-mas… Stream more videos here: https://www.youtube.com/c/SingingReve… For more info: https://www.singingrevealed.com For our singing resources: https://singingrevealed.com/store FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL ————————————————— Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SingingRevealed Instagram: https://instagram.com/singingrevealed TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@singingrevealed#VocalExperts#SingingLessons#SingingRevealed Topics Discussed in this video: 0:02:17 Q: What are the reasons to do overtone in singing? Is it important to know? Why? 0:03:41 VoceVista, Pitches, Harmonics, Overtones, Frequencies, Resonances, Vowels 0:11:50 Q: Is the left brain and right brain connecting similar in any way to synesthesia? 0:13:50 Polyphonic singing with more than one melody 0:14:47 Hearing/listening skills v singing skills in order to learn overtone singing 0:16:20 Overtone tuning anatomy within: mouth, tongue, pharynx, pharyngeal constrictor epilarynx, hyoid bone, uvula 0:20:30 Can you please distinguish between harmonics and formants when you speak about “frequencies”? (vibration in vocal cords, sound energy, amplifiers, resonance) 0:26:04 Tuning first and second formant 0:27:53 Q: May overtone singing help to improve standard singing? (sound energy, amplification, and loudness/volume) 0:31:40 Sound examples singing “Amen” and choir tuning 0:35:07 Q: Is there a library of recordings we can listen to in order to educate and develop our ears to hear overtones (ear training)? 0:37:50 Q: Does the pitch (fundamental frequency) help to filter the frequencies better/make it easier? Can you repeat what the ideal range is for overtone singing for male voice types and female voice types? 0:43:45 Dolphins and overtone singing 0:48:27 Wavelengths, resonance of wavelengths, perception of sound, room acoustics 0:50:23 Q: When you say “add constriction” in your throat, what do you mean? (narrowing: ventricular folds or false vocal folds, aryepiglottic folds, cartilage, arytenoid cartilage) 0:56:44 Q: Are these overtones created by the sound source or are they generated by a separate energy in the vocal tract? Does the vocal tract generate energy or is it a reflection from the source? 1:04:10 Referencing Ingo Titze on inertance

WOLFGANG SAUS ‘s WEBSITE on OVERTONE SINGING

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WOLFGANG SAUS

Overtone Singing

Wolfgang Saus reveals the secret of the art of singing two notes at the same time.Hearing Test* This field is required
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