Category Archives: khusugtun

Khusugtun – Mongolian music in London – BBC Proms 2011 Human Planet

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Khusugtun – Mongolian music in London – BBC Proms 2011 Human Planet

5,049,465 viewsAug 12, 201146KDislikeShareSaveMongolPeace 20.7K subscribers Inspired by the landmark BBC One natural history documentary, Human Planet, this Prom will feature music from the series performed by the BBC Concert Orchestra, alongside musicians from Greenland, Mongolia, Papua New Guinea, the Sakha republic and Zambia. Presented by John Hurt, the voice of the BBC One series, the Prom includes big-screen highlights from the programme.

Human Planet Proms – Khusugtun – Mongol

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Human Planet Proms – Khusugtun – Mongol

118,112 viewsAug 8, 20111KDislikeShareSaveRupertJones 42.8K subscribers Human Planet Proms, ft Khusugtun – Mongol The word ‘khusug’ means a cart used by pastoral nomads, and Khusugtun means the nomads who move with these carts. More generally, the word describes the process of moving camel, horse and yak caravans across the vast Gobi Desert. This transfer of peope and animals is at the heart of traditional Mongolian life. Whole communities are packed up and put on the back of a khusug when the land turns fallow or the winter sets in. From the words of the songs, to the horse-head fiddles they use, Khusugtun capture and evoke movement: this positive, forward-moving energy, tinged with the melancholy of farewell. They are a group who perform songs that Genghis Khan himself would have heard, as well as preserving and bringing the 21st century traditions that hang on a thread, as many Mongolians make one last journey, leaving the Gobi Desert and heading to the city for a new life. {taken from BBC Program notes/ James Parkin}

Khusugtun Band Takes Listeners Back To Mongolia | Asia’s Got Talent Semis 2

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Khusugtun Band Takes Listeners Back To Mongolia | Asia’s Got Talent Semis 2

Ajoutée le 23 avr. 2015

Khusugtun Band’s hypnotic throat singing takes listeners back thousands of years to the majestic mountains of Mongolia. David loves it so much he declares Khusugtun the One Direction of Mongolia!

Khusugtun – Mongolian Throat Singing (Overtone Singing) (Full HD)

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Ajoutée le 4 mars 2014

Please read description!(all credits/ rights belong to their respective owners;not me.)
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credits: Khusugtun – Mongolian music in London – BBC Proms 2011: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQkrsd…
Tremendous 呼麦 Mongolian Throat Singing (Overtone Singing) (Live HD) To download this as mp3 or video file,go to: To download this as mp3 or video file,go to:
http://www.dvdvideosoft.com/products/… go to http://www.youtube-mp3.org/ to download this music as an mp3
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go to http://www.livingwaters.com/ and listen to “hells best kept secret” to learn more.
go to http://www.charityministries.org/ to learn more.

1.Bodacious Refreshing RELAXING “WORLD MUSIC”
https://www.youtube.com/user/APOLLODE…

As always;it is such a very joyous & humbling thing to here from those inspired.
(in Comments ect)
-George ATLANTIANapollodemopolous

Human Planet Proms – Khusugtun – Mongolia

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Uploaded on Aug 7, 2011

Human Planet Proms, ft Khusugtun – Mongol
The word ‘khusug’ means a cart used by pastoral nomads, and Khusugtun means the nomads who move with these carts. More generally, the word describes the process of moving camel, horse and yak caravans across the vast Gobi Desert. This transfer of peope and animals is at the heart of traditional Mongolian life.
Whole communities are packed up and put on the back of a khusug when the land turns fallow or the winter sets in. From the words of the songs, to the horse-head fiddles they use, Khusugtun capture and evoke movement: this positive, forward-moving energy, tinged with the melancholy of farewell. They are a group who perform songs that Genghis Khan himself would have heard, as well as preserving and bringing the 21st century traditions that hang on a thread, as many Mongolians make one last journey, leaving the Gobi Desert and heading to the city for a new life. {taken from BBC Program notes/ James Parkin}