Category Archives: Altai

Bolot Bayrishev – Shaman, ALTAI

Video

Mise en ligne le 22 déc. 2010
Bolot Bayrishev comes from the Russian Republic of Altay. He sings a folk tale in Russian language by using a particularly bold style of throat singing. (Originally posted to http://overtone.ru.)

Visit his site: http://bolot-bairyshev.ru/
Copyright Болот Байрышев|Анна Максимова © 2011

Болот Байрышев – “Шаман”

В небе звезды засияли,
Сопки тихо замирали,
Солнце световать устало –
Над тайгою ночь настала.

Буду спать. Закончен день.
Спит собака, спит олень.
И шаман один не спит –
С бубном у огня сидит.

Все камлает и поет,
Колотушкой бубен бьет,
То как зверь шаман рычит,
То как ворон закричит.

Мухи, птицы, прилетайте!
Мне, шаману, помогайте!
Из лесных своих соседей
Вызываю дух медведей.

О, тайга моя, тайга,
Помоги мне от врага!
Закручусь я, как юла,
И взмою в небо, как стрела.

Shaman

Stars began to shine at the sky,

Hills silently died down…

The sun became weary of giving light –

Nihgt has come to Taiga.

I’m going to sleep. The day has come to an end.

The dog sleeps, the deer sleeps…

& only the Shaman is awake –

He sits by fire with his tambourine.

Singing his ritual songs,

Beating the tambourine,

Growling as an animal,

Crying as a raven.

“Flies, birds, come & help me, the Shaman!

I call the Spirit of bears from my forest neighbours.”

Oh, Taiga, my Taiga!

Help me to cope with the enemy!

As a top I’ll twirl

& will soar up in the sky, like an arrow.

(translated by A.Maksimova)

Altai (not Tuva) Woman – Overtone, Throat & Horse Singing Skills

Video

Mise en ligne le 2 oct. 2011
Concert at The Moscow Military Music Academy, Sep 2011.

Tuva is a part of Russia, inhabited by a Turkic people related to the nearby Mongolians. Tuvans are known abroad for khoomei (xöömej), a kind of overtone singing.

Traditionally music from Tuva was only a solo effort. The musician’s intention was usually to emphasize timbre and harmonics over rhythm. The performances were often in places of natural acoustics such as caves, cliffs, rivers, and so on. The performer would often take long pauses to allow nature its own chance to converse back. The modern music found today is often composed of ensembles of musicians playing multiple instruments and often is much more pulsatile than its traditional uses.