Author Archives: haidiphonie

About haidiphonie

Ethnomusicologist, composer and traditional musician from Vietnam Expert on overtone singing since 1969 Music researcher working at the Music Department, Musée de l'Homme, Paris, France

Tsogtgerel – Chants mongols à Paris

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Tsogtgerel – Chants mongols à Paris

31,133 viewsMay 23, 2013101DislikeShareSaveMONDOMIX 34.7K subscribers Les vastes étendues de steppes mongoles abritent une géographie riche et variée. Ce concert sera l’occasion d’une étape cette fois-ci dans le désert de Gobi, là où dominent les chants longs, urtiin duu. Traditionnellement chantés a cappella, ces chants, où la voix ornemente habilement les subtilités du texte poétique, peuvent être accompagnés par la vièle à tête de cheval, morin kour. A l’ouest, le désert de Gobi touche l’Altaï, là où règne le chant diphonique, ce chant guttural impressionnant qui sera également à l’honneur lors de ce concert. The Long drawn song (in Mongolian, Уртын дуу or Urtyn duu) is central in the traditional music of Mongolia. Eastern Mongols typically use a Morin khuur (horse-head fiddle) as accompaniment, sometimes with an indigenous flute, the limbe. A demonstration was given in Paris. – Musiques, cinéma, BD… Mondomix est aujourd’hui le media incontournable pour suivre l’actualité des cultures du monde entier. Notre équipe réalise chaque semaine de nouvelles vidéos pour vous faire découvrir des artistes d’avenir et vous faire vibrer aux sons d’hier et d’aujourd’hui.

I Международный музыковедческий симпозиум “Хоомей-92”, проходивший в Кызыле с 19 по 23 июня 1992

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I Международный музыковедческий симпозиум “Хоомей-92”, проходивший в Кызыле с 19 по 23 июня 1992

2,632 viewsApr 29, 202041DislikeShareSaveМНЦ Хоомей 51 subscribers По решению жюри международного фестиваля исполнителей хоомея дипломом фестиваля с вручением памятного приза награждены: Данзырын Аяс, Нанжидийн Сэнгэдорж, Нацагийн Тогтог-Хуу, Бадарийн Папизан, Евгений Улугбашев, Ооржак Шончалай, Цэдээгийн Энхбата, Дармашийн Балжинням, Батрай Анчинова. Звание Дипломанта фестиваля с вручением приза получили: Донгак Буян, Тумат Геннадий, Эжээгийн Тойвгоо, Загретдинов Роберт, Куулар Герман, Кара-сал Анатолий. Звание лауреата фестиваля с вручением приза получили: Ховалыг Кайгал-оол, Ондар Конгар-оол, Жугнээгийн Зундуй, Куулар Анатолий. Звание лауреата фестиваля с вручением Гран-при присвоено: Ондар Монгун-оолу. Специальными призами отметили гостей фестиваля: Лео Тадагава (Япония), Шишигина Спиридона (Якутия) Среди ансамблей звание лауреата присудили фольклорной группе «Тыва».

Mongolian traditional art of Khöömei, UNESCO 2010

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Mongolian traditional art of Khöömei

Mongolia

Inscribed in 2010 (5.COM) on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

Khöömei is a form of singing originating in western Mongolia, in the Altai mountains. The performer imitates sounds of nature, simultaneously emitting two distinct vocal sounds: along with a continuous drone, the singer produces a melody of harmonics. Khöömei literally means pharynx, and it is believed to have been learned from birds, whose spirits are central to shamanic practices. The multitude of Khöömei techniques in Mongolia are grouped within two main styles: the kharkhiraa (deep Khöömei) and isgeree Khöömei (whistled Khöömei). In kharkhiraa the singer sings a drone in a normal voice, while emphasizing the undertone or subharmonic one octave below. In isgeree Khöömei, it is the overtones above the fundamental note of the drone that are emphasized, creating a higher-pitched whistle. In both cases, the drone is produced with very taut vocal cords, and the melody is created by modulating the size and shape of the mouth cavity, opening and closing the lips and moving the tongue. Khöömei is performed by Mongolian nomads in a variety of social occasions, from grand state ceremonies to festive household events. Khöömei is also sung during herding, and inside the yurt to lull babies to sleep. Traditionally, Khöömei is transmitted orally from bearer to learner, or via master-to-apprentice. Download © 2009 by S.Yundenbat © 2009 by S.Yundenbat © 2009 by S.Yundenbat © 2009 by S.Yundenbat © 2009 by S.Yundenbat © 2009 by S.Yundenbat © 2009 by S.Yundenbat © 2009 by S.Yundenbat © 2009 by S.Yundenbat © 2009 by A. Duurenjargal © 2009 by A. Duurenjargal © 2009 by A. Duurenjargal © 2009 by Johanni Curtet © 2005 by Johanni Curtet © 2009 by Johanni Curtet © 2009 by Johanni Curtet © 2005 by Johanni Curtet © 2004 by Johanni Curtet © 2004 by Johanni Curtet © 2004 by Johanni Curtet © 2005 by Johanni Curtet © 2009 by Johanni Curtet © 2005 by Johanni Curtet © 2009 by Johanni Curtet © 2009 by Johanni Curtet © 2005 by Johanni Curtet © 2005 by Johanni Curtet © 2005 by Johanni Curtet © 2005 by Johanni Curtet © 2009 by Johanni Curtet © 2007 by Johanni Curtet © 2005 by Johanni Curtet © 2005 by Johanni Curtet © 2009 by Johanni Curtet © 2009 by Johanni Curtet

https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/mongolian-traditional-art-of-khmei-00396

Mongolian art of singing: Khoomei

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Mongolian art of singing: Khoomei

36,411 viewsSep 26, 2009186DislikeShareSaveUNESCO 354K subscribers UNESCO: Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity – 2009 URL: http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/RL/… Description: The Mongolian art of singing: Khoomei, or Hooliin Chor (throat harmony), is a style of singing in which a single performer produces a diversified harmony of multiple voice parts, including a continued bass element produced in the throat. These singers may perform alone or in groups. Khoomei is practised today among Mongolian communities in several countries, especially in Inner Mongolia in northern China, western Mongolia and the Tuva Republic of Russia. Traditionally performed on the occasion of ritual ceremonies, songs express respect and praise for the natural world, for the ancestors of the Mongolian people and for great heroes. The form is reserved for special events and group activities such as horse races, archery and wrestling tournaments, large banquets and sacrificial rituals. The timing and order of songs is often strictly regulated. Khoomei has long been regarded as a central element representing Mongolian culture and remains a strong symbol of national or ethnic identity. As a window into the philosophy and aesthetic values of the Mongol people, it has served as a kind of cultural emissary promoting understanding and friendship among China, Mongolia and Russia, and has attracted attention around the world as a unique form of musical expression. Country(ies): China © 2008 IMARI

TUVA—Shamans and Throat Singers, including Kongar-ool Ondar.

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TUVA—Shamans and Throat Singers, including Kongar-ool Ondar.

597 viewsDec 30, 202027DislikeShareSaveEnduring Voices & Endangered Languages 4.53K subscribers Research and videography by K. David Harrison, as a member of the jury at the Khoomei Festival 1998 in Kyzyl, Republic of Tuva. Notable performers included: Kongar-ool Ondar, Kaigal-ool Khovalyg, David Shomfai Kara (Hungary), and artists from USA and Japan. 1020579 02

Guillem Codern – Tuvan Throat Singing competition – Khoomei Symposium 2018

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Guillem Codern – Tuvan Throat Singing competition – Khoomei Symposium 2018

156 viewsDec 13, 20204DislikeShareSaveMichael ibeam Cline 991 subscribers Guillem Codern from Catalunya Spain competing in the solo xoomei category. I write about my dear friend Guillem and my three trips to the Center of Asia in MY ADVENTURES IN TUVA. Details can be found here: https://bit.ly/MYADVENTURESINTUVA June 2018 Tuvan Cultural Center Kyzyl, Tuva, Russian Federation Looking for TUVAN inspired items? Tap the links to see my online stores. https://www.zazzle.com/collections/tu…https://my-store-11731245.creator-spr…

Ghost Riders in the Sky/ Chylgychynyn Yry performed by Enrique Ugalde with The Tuvan Ensemble

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Ghost Riders in the Sky/ Chylgychynyn Yry performed by Enrique Ugalde with The Tuvan Ensemble

7,618 viewsFeb 11, 2020192DislikeShareSaveEnrique Ugalde

Enrique Ugalde with The Tuvan Ensemble perform a mash up of “Ghost Riders in the Sky” written by Stan Jones and Tuvan folk song, “Chylgyhynyn Yry” (Cowboy Song). Video Production by Ovaa Media. Filmed in the Ulug-Khem region of The Republic of Tuva.