Christopher Bergevin, Chandan Naravan, Joy Williams, Natasha Mhatre, Jennifer KE Steees, Joshua GW Bernstein, Brad Story : Overtone focusing in biphonic tuvan throat singing

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Is a corresponding author

https://elifesciences.org/articles/50476

Overtone focusing in biphonic tuvan throat singing

  1. Christopher Bergevin  Is a corresponding author ,
  2. Chandan Narayan,
  3. Joy Williams,
  4. Natasha Mhatre,
  5. Jennifer KE Steeves,
  6. Joshua GW Bernstein,
  7. Brad Story  Is a corresponding author
  1. Physics and Astronomy, York University, Canada;
  2. Centre for Vision Research, York University, Canada;
  3. Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences, Canada;
  4. Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of California, United States;
  5. Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, York University, Canada;
  6. York MRI Facility, York University, Canada;
  7. Biology, Western University, Canada;
  8. Psychology, York University, Canada;
  9. National Military Audiology & Speech Pathology Center, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, United States

Research Article Feb 12, 2020

Abstract

Khoomei is a unique singing style originating from the republic of Tuva in central Asia. Singers produce two pitches simultaneously: a booming low-frequency rumble alongside a hovering high-pitched whistle-like tone. The biomechanics of this biphonation are not well-understood. Here, we use sound analysis, dynamic magnetic resonance imaging, and vocal tract modeling to demonstrate how biphonation is achieved by modulating vocal tract morphology. Tuvan singers show remarkable control in shaping their vocal tract to narrowly focus the harmonics (or overtones) emanating from their vocal cords. The biphonic sound is a combination of the fundamental pitch and a focused filter state, which is at the higher pitch (1–2 kHz) and formed by merging two formants, thereby greatly enhancing sound-production in a very narrow frequency range. Most importantly, we demonstrate that this biphonation is a phenomenon arising from linear filtering rather than from a nonlinear source.

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